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UrbanPlan for Public Officials @ Urban Marketplace

Date:
April 13
Time:
7:30 am - 4:15 pm
Venue:
Marriott Marquis
Address:
1777 Walker St
Houston, TX 77010 United States

image_1Registration

Seating is limited to the first 18 registrants.
$25 – fee for the entire day. Includes breakfast, lunch and class materials.

Contact Misty Loocke for registration information

What Is UrbanPlan?

UrbanPlan for Public Officials is an engaging workshop that convenes local decision makers for an interactive dialogue about the fundamental forces that affect the built environment and the important leadership roles played by elected and appointed officials.

The workshop enables public officials to better understand the tradeoffs and risks at play in the entitlement and negotiation process associated with land use, especially in public/private partnerships (PPPs). The UrbanPlan case study is an example of a city-led redevelopment effort where compromise is needed from the locality, the development team selected through the RFP, and the community.

By taking on the role of developer, participants in the workshop get a chance to broaden their knowledge in the following areas:

  • the basics of a pro forma and funding of a complex project;
  • the economics of different building types and community benefits;
  • the different time horizons for the public and private sectors;
  • the risk associated with lengthy negotiations among all parties; and
  • the importance of a clear and open process in the selection of a private partner.

Workshop as a Living Case Study

Participants work as competing development teams to respond to a hypothetical request for proposal (RFP) for the redevelopment of a site in the fictitious town of Yorktown. Teams work together, using blocks to represent different building types and a financial analysis tool, to create a feasible proposal that meets the RFP’s objectives, the community’s interests, and the investor’s bottom line. ULI members serve as facilitators challenging the conceptual proposal, act as a selection committee to review the final proposals, and present a case study to spur discussion and analysis.

Who Should Attend the Workshop?image_2

The workshop is intended for elected officials, such as mayors and city council members, as well as appointed officials, such as planning commission members. Typically, the workshop is offered to regional audiences of public officials. The workshop can also, by special arrangement, be offered to elected officials from one jurisdiction, local citizens’ groups, or senior departmental staff.

What to Expect at the Workshop

The workshop typically runs six hours and includes lunch. The agenda for the workshop is as follows:

  • Overview
  • Teams work on vision for RFP proposal
  • Teams build out their proposal
  • Facilitators visit teams
  • Networking lunch
  • Teams revise their proposal
  • Facilitators visit teams a second time
  • Teams finalize their proposal and present it to the Selection Committee
  • ULI member presents case study of local project
  • Discussion of how the workshop will affect the work of public officials in their own community

Dialogue with Real Estate Experts

UrbanPlan workshops benefit from ULI members who volunteer their time to participate in the program and bring a sense of reality to the case study. It presents an opportunity for senior real estate professionals to volunteer and create a dialogue between the private and public sectors that will help improve the community.

Testimonials

Understanding markets and risk makes the public sector better communicators with developer partners. Understanding social and political influences helps developers manage risk more effectively. UrbanPlan could transform the public/private dialogue.
Mark Rhoades, AICP, Past Planning Manager, Berkeley, California; Partner, Citycentric Investments, Oakland, California

The UrbanPlan workshop is an opportunity to gain different perspectives on the development process. It is particularly useful to get a view on the fiscal constraints that developers face when trying to accommodate communities. It’s helpful to understand the balance between getting what you can from a developer but not pushing them too hard, so everyone wins. The Urban Land Institute gave me the opportunity to discover how to accomplish that.
Mayor Patrick Wojahn, College Park, Maryland

Shannon Bird, Director of Community Engagement and a councilmember for the cit of Westminster, CO, confers with her team at the "UrbanPlan for Elected Officials" workshop at the National League of Cities Congressional City Conference, at the Marriott Wardman Park in Washington, D.C., Saturday, March 5, 2016. (photo by Allison Shelley for the Urban Land Institute)

Shannon Bird, Director of Community Engagement and a councilmember for the cit of Westminster, CO, confers with her team at the “UrbanPlan for Elected Officials” workshop at the National League of Cities Congressional City Conference, at the Marriott Wardman Park in Washington, D.C., Saturday, March 5, 2016. (photo by Allison Shelley for the Urban Land Institute)

Members of Team A put down Lego buildings to build their city at the "UrbanPlan for Elected Officials" workshop at the National League of Cities Congressional City Conference, at the Marriott Wardman Park in Washington, D.C., Saturday, March 5, 2016. (photo by Allison Shelley for the Urban Land Institute)

Members of Team A put down Lego buildings to build their city at the “UrbanPlan for Elected Officials” workshop at the National League of Cities Congressional City Conference, at the Marriott Wardman Park in Washington, D.C., Saturday, March 5, 2016. (photo by Allison Shelley for the Urban Land Institute)

 

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